In a conflict, boundaries are overrun with impunity.

Emotional boundaries.

Ethical boundaries.

Psychological boundaries.

When boundaries are overrun, feelings of betrayal and hurt automatically follow because when we have our boundaries overrun, we recognize that the other party has misused and damaged our trust.

The number one word to maintain boundaries is the word “no.”

The problem, of course, is not the obvious overrunning of boundaries. We can say “no” directly and without guilt in these situations.

We are comfortable with that process.

The problem arises when there is seepage through a series of moral and ethical decisions that initially appear to be right, but ultimately turn out to be wrong.

Saying “no” in these situations doesn’t often happen because preservation of personal pride, selfish ego, and other concerns becomes more paramount than the re-establishing of sinking boundaries.

No matter.

“No” is “no.”

But learn when—and where—to use it.

HSCT Publishing

HSCT Publishing

HSCT Publishing is the home of LeadingKeys, a remote, online, e-learning training, and development LMS platform. We work with long-term care, senior living, and assisted living organizations to provide leadership, culture, and talent development for facility staff and administrators. We innovate on people! Contact us for a FREE Demo of LeadingKeys today by clicking here: https://www.leadingkeys.com/