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There will be conflicts, disappointments, failures, stresses, and fears.

There will be other people who don’t perform up to your standards, who misunderstand you, who deliberately sabotage you, and who will treat you inherently unfairly.

There will be organizations (families, workplaces, churches) that will be composed of people, processes, and outcomes, and those organizations will fail in innumerable ways that you can imagine, and ways that you can’t comprehend.

You can do one of two things when confronted with these myriad realities (and more):

You can carry a grudge.

You can carry grace.

Grace is hard to give to others (organizations, people, situations) if you never feel as though it has been applied to you. Grace is hard to give others if you feel as though a genuine wrong has been done. Grace is hard to give to others when you feel as though you are right.

But giving grace is not about your feelings about the act of giving it. Giving grace is about giving up the privilege of carrying a grudge.

Giving up a grudge is hard if you never feel as though you are carrying a grudge. Giving up a grudge is hard if the acts of offense continue to occur despite your best efforts to overcome them. Giving up a grudge is hard if the bureaucracy is impolite, disinterested, or ignoring you.

But giving up a grudge is not about the amorphous “they.” It’s about the very real “you.”

Giving up a grudge, and choosing to carry grace in the face of everything that can happen to you—from the disappointments to the failures—is a future oriented act.

Give up to get the tomorrow you are desperately seeking today.

Jesan Sorrells

Jesan Sorrells

Jesan Sorrells is the CEO and Founder of Human Services Consulting and Training and lead on HSCT's flagship product, LeadingKeys. Contact him directly at jsorrells@hsconsultingandtraining.com

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